5 reasons you feel stuck in your career

From early childhood, we start idolising people – our parents, grandparents, teachers, aunts and uncles, pop stars, a pilot, cops or firefighters. As soon as we are old enough to understand what each person around us does for a living, we start either liking or disliking it. Subconsciously, our minds begin making choices about which ‘profession’ we would like to venture into and which we dislike. We are also groomed (or maybe forced in some cases) to choose a career path that is traditionally high paying and secure.

But eventually, I guess we all choose something that we like doing or that we are good at.

I know I could just end the blog here and say ‘happily ever after’ went our careers. But sometimes, no matter how wisely we choose a career or job for ourselves, there may arise a standpoint when you start feeling stuck in that job. In simple words, feeling stuck in a situation where you seem not to be able to leave your present job but feel highly dissatisfied with work. The same mundane tasks you have mastered over the years do not offer any more learning or excitement, and you do not look forward to going to work.

While there can be numerous reasons why you may be feeling stuck at work, in my opinion, here are the top 5 reasons that might resonate with you:

1. Accepting a job role without understanding it entirely

At the time, you may have felt this job role was appropriate for you, something you always dreamt of doing. But eventually, you realise the position is much more or much less than you expected. The role does not fit like a glove but, in actuality, feels like a noose.

2.  $$$$ ruled

Photo credit: Unsplash.com

When you signed on for the job, it offered a lucrative signing bonus with stock options and an unbelievable year-end bonus! It was too good to be true, and it was irresistible. It’s only when you started the job and over time that you realised the downside of all the ‘extra’ money you received. You might not feel that the money is not worth the time and effort you must put in. The work-life balance has only become a topic for discussion as you have not experienced a day without stress and pressure at work.

3. Outdated skillset

Photo credit:Canva.com

Many people will agree that they achieve job satisfaction from not just the salaries and bonuses they receive, but greater satisfaction is realised when they see their meaningful contributions resulting in higher profits, efficiency, or global expansions. A continuous learning curve is a high point for many people to feel happy in their careers. If this is lacking and you think your skills are becoming redundant, dissatisfaction starts sinking in. You may feel worthless and lose confidence eventually in your skillset.

4. Not enough recognition at work

This is another factor that makes you feel stuck at work. Your work is not recognised, and your boss has been fending the next promotion and increment questions you have been asking for. Even after mastering the work and putting in time and effort, your job does not seem rewarding anymore.

5. Fear factor

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Change is not everyone’s cup of tea. Everyone is afraid of the unknown. Stagnation happens when you are fearful of making a move. You may be applying for a new job, but inside, you know you are stuck in the current job and unable to move. Not receiving any favourable response from job search also reinstates the lingering fear.

Our career is one of the most important aspects of our lives. Most of us spend the majority of our time, say 8-10 hours, at our jobs out of the 24 hours. You can follow a few simple steps to overcome this situation of feeling stuck at work. Stay tuned and check out this space for my next blog, five easy steps to break free and get unstuck in your career!

6 questions to ask before deciding to do an online Master’s Degree programme

Deciding whether to do a master’s degree is a tough decision, and in some cases, it might even be an inevitable decision.

It is a tough decision if you have been out of the school environment for a few years – getting back to school can be challenging. You might have a family of your own, and from experience, I know it is a significant financial and time commitment. Then there are the pressures and deadlines you have to meet at your job, and I am sure there are many other personal obstacles unique to the individual. And the decision becomes inevitable as it is one of the options available to help you continue to grow – as a person and in your career.

Photo by Joan Kwamboka on Unsplash.

So, when is the right time to do a master’s degree programme? I can’t answer that for you, but the following are six points to consider that might help you make an informed decision.

1. Passion for the subject

With so many distractions and commitments vying for your attention, if you choose to do a programme that you have little interest in studying, chances are, it will be pushed right to the bottom of the list of your priorities. You will end up taking very little away from the programme and might end up performing poorly in your evaluations and even failing the course.

Photo by Randalyn Hill on Unsplash.

I suggest you choose a subject you are passionate about, something you want to learn. Your interest will naturally result in you putting in the effort to learn and will result in better overall performance in your evaluations.

2. Relevance of the subject

For most working professionals, time is precious. So, there has to be a reason for every extra calicular thing you plan on doing. If you intend to do a master’s degree and are not passionate about the subject, then the next best option (or even the primary option) is choosing a programme that will benefit you professionally. Something that adds knowledge to what you are already doing professionally or, at the very least, helps your growth in your career.

3. Are you a self-starter?

Unlike an on-campus programme where you are physically present in class on a daily basis, guided every step of the way by a professor and closely interact with other students. In an online programme, you are in the driver’s seat; the onus is up to you to complete assignments on time, put time aside to study regularly, and take the initiative to do all you can to complete the programme successfully.  

But this does not mean you will not have any support. At least in the case of Robert Kennedy College, with our online campus and library, online forums, live classroom sessions, student care and last but not least, the online residency, you will have lots of support in completing the programme!

4. Accreditation and Recognition

If you are going to do an online master’s degree, then make sure the degree you earn has value. Find out:

  • Which university will award the degree?
  • What is the reputation of the university?
  • How is the university accredited?

These are just three questions to help you get started. Think of more relevant questions, and don’t be afraid to ask.

Want to know more about the universities we have an exclusive partnership with? Click here to learn more!

5. Is it all a façade?

You have to know what you are signing up for? Is the college just going to give you some online study material and then wash their hands off you? Ask:

  • Who are going to be your teachers?
  • Is there trial access you can have to get a feel of how the programme is run?
  • Can you talk with current students or alumni to get feedback?
  • How are the evaluations done?
  • What are the modules involved in the programme?

Again, these are just a few questions to help you get started.

At Robert Kennedy College, you can Chat Live on WhatsApp with our Education Advisors and ask all your questions, ask them about our programmes and our key faculty members, open a trial account to access our OnlineCampus or request to connect with our alumni.

6. Fees

Photo by Sharon McCutcheon on Unsplash.

Finally, the fees – is the programme something that you can financially handle? What are the payment terms? Does the company you are employed with have a sponsorship programme?


These points are just six simple tips to help you ask the right questions before joining an online master’s degree programme. Please share any other questions you deemed necessary to help you make an informed decision.

If you are ready to apply for one of our programmes, click here.

#DILO (A day in the life of) a master’s student – Paul

Here’s presenting another gem of our #dilo -a day in the life of RKC student series. We asked some of our past and current students to share their thoughts and opinions, to give their feedback on how they handled the challenges of online learning. 

There is no better way but to learn from those who came before and see if what worked for them will help you become a better student! Hopefully, this will help you to make an informed decision..

An Introduction

Who are you, really?

I am a Supply Chain Officer(Procurement) and my brief involves acquisition of goods, works, services , consulting and non consulting services for a project funded by the World Bank in the energy sector.

Which programme did you choose and why?

MSc in Procurement,Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Having been in supply chain management for well over 20 years, I felt that by acquiring advanced qualifications would enhance my unique capabilities in supply chain management. My overall goal is to offer consulting services independently as a consultant or contractor.

The Study Plan

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? How many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?

By allocating at least three hours daily for each unit in the morning and after finishing my day’s work. I spent weekends studying and sometimes reading up to midnight to catch up with the tutorial offered by UoS (University of Salford) and RKC (Robert Kennedy College). Strictly adhering to my study schedule, it really worked for me.

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)  

Early mornings an hour and two hours in the evening. Saturday I spent the whole day studying and on Sundays half a day.

How much time did you devote to each assignment?  

I devoted at least a week fo revision, drafting and finalizing the assignment.

Photo credit: Canva.com

Travelling and Communication  

How did travelling impact your ability to study?  

Much of it positively. However, there was one instance that I was negatively impacted when in an overseas travel. I experienced network problems and unlucky fell unwell for a whole week in the final submission time.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?  

Ensuring that I respond to all posts and participate actively when I have time. Every time after work I had to go through all posts and submitted my posts too to any forum discussions.

A typical day as a master’s student  

What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you?  

Extremely busy for me but very flexible given my tight work schedule.

Photo credit: Canva.com

Any advice?  

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.  

One has got to have interest in the studies.This is quite self motivating and gives one the impetus to keep studying despite challenges that come from busy work schedule.

I hope this blog has answered some of your questions, and please watch this place for similar blogs. So, if you have been thinking about doing a master’s degree and now understand how to study better for an online programme, look at our programmes and see if anything interests you.

You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on all the programmes we offer, the application process, and answers to any questions you may have.

7 ways to better understand your Sleep Cycle

Photo by Alexander Possingham on Unsplash.

When I was growing up, sleeping was one of my favourite things to do. I used to sleep late but could just keep sleeping and wake up late. But as I grew older and with responsibility ever-increasing, sleeping late soon became a thing of the past. Unfortunately, I had gotten into the habit of sleeping late (something I still haven’t gotten over), resulting in less sleep than I liked.

Our regular readers might have noticed that we have covered “sleep” in several of our previous blogs, either on its own or as an essential part of another self-improvement blog. This is because almost every study highlights the importance of a healthy sleep cycle.

But what constitutes a healthy sleep cycle? The following are seven tips to help you identify what makes a healthy sleep cycle.

1.    There is no such thing as a “golden rule”

Do you really need eight hours of sleep? Photo by Mpho Mojapelo on Unsplash.

How often have we been advised “always to get at least 8 hours of sleep a day”? If I had a penny for every time someone told me that, I would at least have close to a pound by now. This golden rule has become so ingrained in our psyche that for most of us if we don’t get eight hours of sleep, we feel worn out the next day. The fact is, for most of us, the ideal daily requirement of sleep is between seven and nine hours, dependent on several factors such as fatigue levels, the time we go to sleep, etc.

Then there are those lucky few who, according to the National Institute of Health, have a unique gene that enables them to require only four to five hours of sleep daily for optimal and regular performance.

So, figure out what is your “golden rule”!

2.    Reduced sleep does not increase efficiency

For those of us who lead a busy life, it might seem that there are never enough hours in a day. We might try to make up for this by reducing the number of hours we get to sleep [because where else can you get the time? (I am being sarcastic here)], let’s say by reducing an hour of sleep from our ideal sleep cycle. Now, if we do this for an entire week, that is seven hours taken away from our ideal sleep cycle, and if we think this would not have an impact on us, we would be wrong. All you will achieve is increasing your fatigue levels and reducing your productivity.

3.    Bored vs Sleepy

Photo by Tony Tran on Unsplash.

Another way of identifying if you are getting adequate sleep per your ideal sleep cycle is by noticing if you are falling asleep at unexpected times during the day. Maybe in class or at a meeting, or even at the movies. If you are otherwise healthy and tend to fall asleep at unexpected times, you are not getting adequate sleep. It is not because you are lazy or bored. You can be bored as hell in a class and still be wide awake.

So, check your sleep cycle, maybe increase an hour to the cycle and see if there is an improvement.

4.    Identify your sleep cycle

No one said a sleep cycle must be continuous. Let’s say your ideal sleep cycle is 7 hours a day. If you can sleep the seven hours continuously, that is great, but if you can’t, consider breaking up the cycle, five hours at night and two hours midday. Experiment and find out what sleep cycle works for you.

5.    Older people need less sleep

False! While it is true that children and teenagers might require more sleep to cater to their growing bodies. Once you are an adult, your ideal sleep cycle will remain consistent. So, even if your sleep schedule moves around a bit during your life, your ideal sleep cycle length should stay the same.

6.    Temperature control

Photo by Markus Winkler on Unsplash.

I hate warm and cosy! I just can’t sleep when it is warm, and I just sweat buckets. I like my room cold (the exact opposite of my wife’s); usually, the temperature in my room is set to about sixteen degrees centigrade. And this is what I need to get a comfortable night’s sleep. Find out what works for you and what will help you achieve your ideal sleep cycle.

7.    Too much sleep

Just like getting too little sleep, getting too much sleep can also be detrimental to a person’s mental and physical health. According to a study listed in the National Library of Medicine, “In the general population, sleeping too much was associated with psychiatric diseases and higher body mass index (BMI)”.

So, stick to your ideal sleep cycle and don’t think you can make up for the loss of sleep by sleeping extra a couple of days a week.


Hopefully, these seven tips will help you manage your ideal sleep cycle better, thereby improving your quality of life and improving your work-life-study balance. If you have any other tips that might help our readers manage their sleep cycle better, please share them here.   

If you have been thinking about doing a master’s degree, and are ready to challenge yourself, look at our list of programmes and see if we have anything you are interested in doing.

You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on the programme that is right for you, the application process, and details on discounts we might be offering at this time.

Art of overcoming writer’s block – 5 easy ways to conquer the fear of writing assignments 

Have you ever encountered writer’s block? Ever felt evasive when it comes to academic writing? Or procrastinate until the last-minute submission deadline?  

Do not worry. You are not alone. I have encountered writer’s block more often than I thought I would.  

What are the main reasons one feels anxiety about academic writing or writing in general?  

There could be several reasons for fear and anxiety. Here are some of the common causes:  

1. I am not a good writer 

This, hands down is one of the foremost causes of anxiety about writing. Not having confidence or faith in one’s writing skills can have a long-standing effect on a person. Having writer’s block could be misunderstood as the inadequacy of flair of writing. Sometimes we tend to compare ourselves with our fellow students or colleagues who seem very natural and good at writing. One may believe that no matter how much effort and hard work they put in, they can never attain perfection or good scores for the assignment.  

2. Writing is not my cup of tea  

It is expected that one refrain from practising things that we do not excel in or require additional effort. Writing may seem outwardly difficult (maybe impossible) and thus a time-consuming task. It can be challenging to stay motivated when an assigned task seems difficult!  

Photo credit: Canva.com

3. Language resistance  

You will inadvertently feel uncomfortable writing in English if English isn’t your native language. One may not have adequate vocabulary built to express their ideas and thought processes.  

4. Lack of time  

We are all busy multi-tasking and juggling work, family, and studies simultaneously. There is always stress and fear if you will be able to finish and submit the assignments on time. And the situation could get worse if you are a procrastinator (like me…) who would always run out of time on assignments.  

Do you run out of time on submitting assignments? Photo credit: Canva.com

5. I lack knowledge 

There are high chances that you experience writer’s block if you are not well versed with the topic of the assignment or do not have a clear understanding. You will feel the pressure of necessity of correctness and formality inhibiting. You may seem lost trying to figure out where to start writing, lack original ideas and fear critical judgement if quality work is not delivered.  

While it may seem to be a grave issue, there are simple ways with which one can conquer the fear and anxiety of writing.   

Here are 5 simple ways:  

1. Follow 3 R’s of writing  

For effective writing, the first and foremost step is to follow the 3 R’s – Read, Research, Reread. When submitting assignments, one needs to be a pro on the topic. Knowledge is power. Read as much as you can from different sources. The more you research and read, the easier it will be to present your thoughts and ideas on the assignment topic. Visit various resources to solidify your thoughts before starting.  

2. Mind-mapping  

Once armed with the power of knowledge, practice mind-mapping. Start writing down ideas, create an outline and write bullet points. If you are more of a visual’s person, draw a flowchart of your ideas right from the introduction to the conclusion of the assignment. And then proceed to elaborate your thoughts on each of the points.  

Photo credit: Canva.com

3. Start early  

Never add another stress point to an existing stress mix. If you feel you run out of time, always give yourself leeway and start well in advance of the assignment submission deadline. This will provide you with more time to read and research and brew your ideas.  

4. Practice makes perfect  

To overcome one’s fear, sometimes the best remedy is to face it head-on. Practice your writing on other subject related ideas and get in the habit of formulating and practising presentations. In due course, you will feel comfortable and develop positive writing experiences.  

5. Just start!  

Turn away from any distractions that are stopping you from accomplishing your goal. Simply start writing, no matter what and get yourself started on writing. When you achieve this first step, congratulate yourself and jump to the next step.  

I hope these easy five ways will help you overcome writer’s block. I know there are many other methods that might work or have worked better for you. Which method did you use?  Share some of the tips in the comments section below. 

6 ways to manage your time better!

For some of us, there are never enough hours in a day. No matter what we do, we just don’t seem to be able to do all that we intend to do before the end of the day. We just end up overworking (what I mean by “work” here is not only related to our jobs but to all the tasks we need to get done during the day), taking away more from the “me” time.

Get more done by managing your time better. Photo by Kevin Ku on Unsplash.

But the fact is, for most of us, the main reason we don’t have enough time to complete everything we have to get done, is that we tend to simply over-think or don’t know how to make a plan and then stick to it or we simply procrastinate.

In fact, one of the reasons why more and more people are choosing to study online is because they don’t have the time to do a full-time or on-campus executive programme and an online programme help in managing time better by freeing up time.

The following are six ways to help you manage your time better. Hopefully, incorporating some of these tips in your life will not only help you manage your student life better but also improve your work-life balance.

(1) Try not to multitask!

Most of us think we are capable of multitasking. But the fact is 97.5% of us are incapable of multitasking, and when we hear this fact, most of us think we fall into that 2.5% capable of multitasking. So, let’s be realistic and assume we are incapable of multitasking and focusing on completing just one task at a time. You will find that your brain will be less tired when focusing on just one task, and you will be able to complete the task effectively and efficiently.

(2) Schedule Everything!

I have no idea how many times I have mentioned this point, but the key to managing time better is planning your day, your week, your month and broadly, even your year (wait, doesn’t this sound like part of a song?). People who use a calendar know how useful it can be to increase efficiency. The organiser/calendar is a tool that can be far more useful than reminding you of your next meeting. Create a calendar that contains every minutia of your daily activities for the week/month/quarter (however long you can go), from household chores to study/work deadlines. Then populate the calendar with your family’s schedule; this will give you a good idea of your schedule, inform you when to expect distractions from your family, and help you plan for it.

(3) Separate the logical from the creative

It is said that the human brain is divided into two halves – the creative side and the logical side. If we are engaged in a logic related activity, immediately shifting to a creative activity will cause us to stutter and stall. So, when you plan your day or week, make sure there is a clear divide between the two activities to give your brain the time to reorient itself. So, maybe logical mornings and creative afternoons?

(4) Stacking tasks

This point is a logical follow-up to the previous point. Stack similar tasks together. It sounds so logical and straightforward; if you have to do similar or continual tasks, then by stacking them together, you will increase your work efficiency and save time. Check your calendar and let me know how much stacking you have done?

(5) Just let go and be free

Photo by Samuel Regan-Asante on Unsplash.

It is never a good idea to revel in the glories of the past or wallow in the miseries of failure. If you have had success, celebrate it and then move on to your next assignment or challenge. If you have failed, then you have failed – analyse it, learn from it, and move on. Don’t get stuck in the past, you will just end up wasting time.

(6) Have a Goal

Goals give you something to work towards. How does this help you in managing time better? Well, all the other points I mentioned here will become moot if you don’t have anything you are working towards. All your planning, achievements and work ethics goes out of the window if you don’t have a goal you are working towards. So, if you don’t have a goal, then what is the point of even reading this blog? You have already achieved everything in life.


These points are just six simple tips to help you manage time better. I would appreciate it if you would share your tips on time management. What has worked best for you?

If you have been thinking about doing a master’s degree, and are ready to challenge yourself, look at our list of programmes and see if we have anything you are interested in doing.

You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on the programme that is right for you, the application process, and details on discounts we might be offering at this time.

Live session with Robert Kennedy College Dean Dr. iur. David Costa

Yesterday, Robert Kennedy College (RKC) Dean, Dr David Costa, conducted a live session introducing our 100% online master’s and bachelor’s degree programmes. This interactive session was held online and was packed with essential facts and information about the college, the universities RKC has partnerships with, and the master’s and bachelor’s programmes we offer. The session received an overwhelming response and participation from all the attendees.

As the session began, Prof. David Costa gave a brief presentation about the history of Robert Kennedy College. He also provided information about the University of Cumbria, the University of Salford and York St John University. The presentation also showed the participant’s sample degrees certificates and transcripts from all three universities.

Prof. Costa also explained the reasons that make RKC’s degrees unique. The factors include (but are not limited to):

  • a practical and flexible online programme
  • minimum duration of one year
  • 100% online, contemporary courses
  • no formal examination system, assessment based on assignments
  • British degrees that are recognized worldwide

Prof. Costa also discussed the fee information and the discounts being currently offered. He also introduced our “ask the Ambassador” initiative, which allows you to chat with either a current student or alumni and ask any programme related questions or about their experience studying at RKC.

After the presentation, Prof. Costa opened the floor to questions from the interested candidates. He answered queries ranging from fee information, assessment method, eligibility requirements, referral discounts, course delivery methods, and more.

Does this look like something you wanted to attend and get information first-hand from the Dean himself? Do not worry. You can watch the live session recording and find answers to your questions. And if you still have questions or feel confident to apply right away, talk to one of our advisors in real-time on WhatsApp.

#DILO (A day in the life of) a master’s student – Paul

Continuing our a day in the life of RKC student series, we asked some of our past and current students to share their thoughts and opinions, to give their feedback on how they handled the challenges of online learning. 

There is no better way but to learn from those who came before and see if what worked for them will help you become a better student! Hopefully, this will help you to make an informed decision..

An Introduction

Who are you, really?

I am Paul M.

Which programme did you choose and why?

The MBA programme. The MBA obviously has the essential business basics, that improves our ability as leaders with contemporaneous knowledge of current best practices combined with reiteration of essential skills which every leader should know. I chose RKC because of the convenience of an online degree and the fact that it partnered with quality UK universities.

The Study Plan

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? How many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?

Robert Burns’ poem To a Mouse, (1786) includes the line “the best made plans of mice and men” which is interpreted that even the best made plans will go wrong…and they did. I set aside time each evening for course reading and the online availability made it easy when traveling. Over weekends, I was locked down on Sunday evenings until midnight, regardless. Each week required at least 12 -20 hours of study time to see any progress.

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)  

Evenings and the occasional early morning.

How much time did you devote to each assignment?  

Each class has different requirements, so this is tough to quantify. In average each assignment (Paper/ report) requires around 40 hours of self directed study and another 20 in terms of prep and writing the paper. The dissertation is a whole different time management project and requires STRUCTURE, if you cannot be structured and meet / set deadlines this will be a challenge.

Photo credit: Canva.com

Travelling and Communication  

How did travelling impact your ability to study?  

If there was internet, I was on the site!

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?  

Some direct messaging and interactions mostly on the forums. It was much more due to COVID.

A typical day as a master’s student  

What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you?  

FIRST THING 1) Check forum posts

2) Check for any updates on syllabus and deadlines 3) Plan any activity for the day 4) Regular work day 5) Study one to two hours and engage on forum.

Photo credit: Canva.com

Any advice?  

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.  

Have a plan and work the plan. If you fail, reset and get back on the plan, learn to adapt to the challenges that life sends you. Above all have fun the end result is worth it.

I hope this blog has answered some of your questions, and please watch this place for similar blogs. So, if you have been thinking about doing a master’s degree and now understand how to study better for an online programme, look at our programmes and see if anything interests you.

You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on all the programmes we offer, the application process, and answers to any questions you may have.

#DILO (A day in the life of) a master’s student – Tahera Sultana

Continuing with our series of blogs that answer some of the questions we at Robert Kennedy College (RKC) get asked frequently by students looking to join one of our online programmes. We asked some of our past and current students to share their thoughts and opinions, to give their feedback on how they handled the challenges of online learning. Hopefully, this will help you to make an informed decision.

Let’s learn from those who came before and see if what worked for them will help you become a better student!

Be disciplined and prepared to devote time and energy to the course.

Tahera Sultana

An Introduction

Photo by Vladislav Klapin on Unsplash.

Who are you?

Hi, my name is Tahera Sultana (it means pure). I am female, married with no children. I am also a Compliance Officer and have worked for different financial institutions for more than 20 years.

Which programme did you choose and why?

I am studying the Master of Laws (LLM) programme. I have been working in the compliance field for over twenty years, and I find more of my colleagues and subordinates are law graduates. I thought to myself, if I pursue a law degree, I could enhance my knowledge grow beyond being a Compliance Officer.

The Study Plan

Photo by Glenn Carstens-Peters on Unsplash.

How did you plan to study each module, and what was the reality? For example, how many hours did/do you have to put in each day/or in a week?

I am a full-time employee and a part-time student. Before starting a module, I will understand the module requirement that I am about to enrol. Each week, I print out all presentation material and listen to the recorded lecture; I make my notes and review the lecture a few times until I can digest the topic. I spent approximately one hour per week on lectures and 2-3 hours reading time for the required chapter in the module.

I spent most of the time working on my given assignment. The research process takes up to 10 hours. After reading the related material, I will start writing the paper. As I have done three modules so far in the programme, writing time takes up to 5-6 hours per 1,000 words. As a full-time employee, I work on my assignment in the evening and during the weekend. Assignment time is not an easy task for me, but a very fruitful experience. I enjoy writing on meaningful and interesting topics.

What part of the day did/do you find most suitable to study? (e.g. early mornings, lunch break, evenings, weekends?)

I had no choice in choosing my study time. For me, after work is the most suitable time to study. If I had a choice, I would have chosen early mornings to do my studies. For the most part, weekends are not good for me because I work from Monday to Friday, from 9:00 am to 7:30 pm (normal office hours is 9 to 6, but in Hong Kong, we have unofficial long working hours). Over the weekend, I go hiking and spend time with my family. If I have to complete an assignment, I will work extra hours during the week to meet the deadline. I will also skip hiking and family time to achieve the goal.

How much time did you devote to each assignment?

Every 1000 words will take me approximately 5-6 hours of writing time. I devote approximately 20 to 22 hours to each assignment (excluding research & reading material).

Travelling and Communication

The challenges of learning while travelling. Photo by JESHOOTS.COM on Unsplash.

How did travelling impact your ability to study?

I find it very hard to study if I have to travel. I may skip one weeks’ lecture and catch up in the coming weeks, i.e., after my business travel. If I have to submit an assignment during my travel, I carry all my research material onto the aircraft and work during the flight. I remember, it was late Jan 2020, I had to fly from Hong Kong to London; I worked 10 hours on the flight. Fortunately, I had three hours of sleep during that trip.

How were you able to interact with peers and/or professors given the time differences?

Interacting with peers and professors is no big deal in these modules. We have once or twice zoom / Blue Jean meetings in each module. I am not concerned about the time difference, as I am in Asia; 3:00 pm London/Swiss time is 9:00 pm Hong Kong time. That suits me, for I can join after office hours. However, when I am travelling, there will be a problem with the change in the time difference, and I might end up missing the meeting. At one time I remember I used my computer in the hotel during my business trip to interact with the whole class; I could not hear clearly what they were discussing due to hotel Wi-Fi.

A typical day as a master’s student

What does a typical day as an Online Masters’ student look like for you?

I find myself glad that there is an online course that I can take advantage of. I can still work as a full-time employee and study during my off-hours, although it is not an easy task when there is travelling involved. I take pride in my decision to gain a Master’s degree; I understand that hard work is needed, and I know this will help me progress and enhance to the next level.

Any advice?

Any advice you have for students to better plan their studies.

Be disciplined and prepared to devote time and energy to the course. Know that all classmates are your partners, and the professors are very experienced and are there to help you succeed. I am glad that I made a good choice to achieve my Master’s degree.


I hope this blog has answered some of your questions, and please watch this place for similar blogs. So, if you have been thinking about doing a master’s degree and now understand how to study better for an online programme, look at our programmes and see if anything interests you.

You can also chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on the programme that is right for you, the application process, and for details on discounts we might be offering at this time.

Nutrition and Academic Performance

Dis-moi ce que tu manges, je te dirai ce que tu es.”
[Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you what you are].

Anthelme Brillat-Savarin

You might be wonder why I am writing about food today and what is its impact on studying the master’s programme and academic performance. It is a widely believed fact that you are what you eat. Studies have shown that the food that we eat has a bearing on our academic performance. Hence the direct correlation between nutrition and academic performance.

When I was a young kid, my mother always insisted on eating healthy food and wanted my brother and me to develop healthy eating habits. But we loved what every other kid adores – junk food. I preferred eating French fries over broccoli any day; little did we understand the effect of food on our bodies and mental health. Nor did I realise that not eating a balanced diet could lead to several deficiencies in the body, such as iron deficiency, vitamins, iodine, and zinc. These deficiencies can negatively impact cognition, intuition, perception and, mental concentration. 

Photo credit: Unsplash.com

According to WHO, nutrition is an essential element of the health and development of human life. Food plays a vital role in physical and mental development, productivity, and performance. Food is fuel for our body and mind. Eating right early in life yields benefits in the later stages of life as we grow older. It becomes even more critical as an adult to maintain good eating habits and consume nutritional food as there are many roles and responsibilities one caters to in everyday life. From being a parent, to being a business owner, working for a corporation or being a mature student, one will wear many hats. You can take care of others only when you yourself are healthy and in good health. Studying for a master’s is a challenge while balancing study, work and life. 

Here are 3 ways how nutrition effects academic performance:

Cognitive development

Good nutritional food brings satisfaction to the body. With a satisfied body and mind one can have better concentration and self-actualization. If there is no fuel provided to the body, the mind becomes sluggish too and there is a lag in the need to excel in studies. Hence good nutrition is necessary for the optimum realisation of one’s cognitive and economic potential. 

Good nutrition is necessary for the optimum realisation of one’s cognitive and economic potential. Photo Credit: Canva.com

Better learning potential

Healthy mind stays in a healthy body. Our brain’s potential is much more than we actually utilise it. Providing adequate nutrition and rather enhancing our diet with super foods improves mental learning performance manyfold. The spontaneity of student and concentration is much better when they are well nourished. This is turn improves the learning potential. 

Build immunity and prevent illnesses

Our cells produce energy required for all our daily tasks and also for additional un-anticipated events. Last few years have been very challenging with Covid-19 spreading all over the world and only fittest could survive. Good nutrition will ensure your body has built adequate immunity to fight all the unprecedented diseases and illnesses. And when the body is illness free, the mind can excel in academic performance. 

Photo credit: Canva.com

Good food, balance diet and exercise is the mantra for healthy living and excelling your academic performance. Also check out our blog on how exercise can make you a better student.

Chat LIVE on WhatsApp with one of our Education Advisors for more information on all the 100% online master’s degree programmes we offer and the application process.